In June, the Jersey City JUG had two meetups:


Legacy Open Source Fridays

Every Friday since April, we’re mending some famous old code that inspired a generation of programmers — and still provides the foundation of many production systems. And we’re making good progress:

Glad the work we’ve done over the last couple months have finally started to show their fruits of labor. Today we finally were able to build tests for our legacy opensource project! Now the fun truly begins!
Joel Samaroo

Contribute to Open Source with an experienced, kind, inclusive, and slightly silly guide. Gain new insights into your own legacy code. Have lots of fun doing it. One of these Fridays, join us.

Posted Wed Jun 30 10:55:17 2021 Tags:

On Thursday, June 17, for the 6th edition of “Legacy of SoCraTes”, I gave a public talk with this abstract:

In inside-out TDD, we incrementally redesign objects, their interactions, and the system as a whole, starting in the small and moving toward the large. In something we might by extension want to call “Inside-Out TDD-Driven Development”, we incrementally redesign ourselves, our interactions, and our systems of work, starting in the small and expanding outward. I’ll tell some personal stories about the impact of software craft on emotional states and working relationships, and I’ll lay out my reasoning for Inside-Out TDDDD being perhaps the most effective path toward greater joy and humanity in software development.

The talk is about technical practices, sort of — in the sense that we can use them to improve our emotional states, working relationships, and business results.

Listener feedback has included:

”I loved it. It was fantastic. My heart contains more praise than I know how to put into words.”

”Only a quarter of the way in and I’m loving this talk. Lots of notes taken and quotes stolen already…. Your perspective adds a whole ‘nother layer of richness that I never realized until now was there.”

”Stories that teach in so many dimensions!”

Video:

Posted Thu Jun 17 11:00:00 2021 Tags:

For the May meetup of the Jersey City JUG, Ryan Latta presented Learning Under Pressure: Scala in a Hurry.

About the presentation:

How many times have you learned a new piece of tech while at work? I know for me it seems like every new project comes with some new framework or language. At the same time, most of the companies I’ve worked for expected me and the team to figure it out — no books, no experts.

I want to share a story of how I learned Scala and Finagle while under the pressure to deliver with hard SLAs. I’ll show you how you can use the same techniques to learn languages, frameworks, and tools without your codebase turning into copy-pasta from Stack Overflow and countless tutorials.

Ryan’s talk reminded me of a similar approach I took to learn a programming language while under the pressure to make good use of an afternoon at a conference. His context and his presentation make a stronger case. Watch.


Legacy Open Source Fridays

Last month, I kicked off a new weekly offering at PubMob. Every Friday, we’re mending some famous old code that inspired a generation of programmers — and still provides the foundation of many production systems.

”If you work with legacy code, don’t miss this! Or if you work with code of any sort, you’re likely to learn something useful.” — Esther Derby

Contribute to Open Source with an experienced, kind, inclusive, and slightly silly guide. Take pride in your efforts and how they multiply over time. Gain new insights into your own legacy code. Have lots of fun doing it.

”A great opportunity to learn technical excellence with one of the best out there. At the lower rate, it’s a no-brainer.” — Ryan Ripley

We already have several regulars who participate every Friday, and a well-known tech company already has me doing a private in-house version of the same material. See for yourself what the excitement is all about. One of these Fridays, join us.

Posted Tue May 11 17:25:15 2021 Tags:

For the April meetup of the Jersey City JUG, Cat Swetel and Heidi Mitre presented Continuous Verification: Beyond Chaos Engineering.

About the presentation:

As technologists, our work is increasingly situated in highly complex socio-technical ecosystems. As much as we are encouraged to retrospectively seek a distinct and absolute root cause for an incident or outage, these complex systems are much more likely to drift into failure rather than suddenly taking one catastrophic wrong turn. What if you and your colleagues could be sensitized to the drifting safety boundaries of your systems? How would that inform the work you do? Join this session to explore these ideas through an introduction — with Java-oriented examples — to the important new discipline of continuous verification.

Watch.


Legacy Open Source Fridays

I’ve just kicked off a new offering at PubMob. Every week, we’re mending some famous old code that inspired a generation of programmers — and still provides the foundation of many production systems.

”If you work with legacy code, don’t miss this! Or if you work with code of any sort, you’re likely to learn something useful.”
Esther Derby

Upon the conclusion of our first Legacy Open Source Friday, three participants immediately registered for every available session in the booking system. (I’ll have to enter more sessions.) One of them told me:

”You have a good vision and confidence in the project. That energy is contagious. Everyone felt the excitement.”
— a participant

Contribute to Open Source with an experienced, kind, inclusive, and slightly silly guide. Take pride in your efforts and how they multiply over time. Gain new insights into your own legacy code. Have lots of fun doing it.

”A great opportunity to learn technical excellence with one of the best out there. At the lower rate, it’s a no-brainer.”
Ryan Ripley

See for yourself what the excitement is all about. One of these Fridays, join us.

Posted Wed Apr 7 04:54:22 2021 Tags:

On Friday, March 19, at the invitation of AO.com, I gave a public talk about joy and humanity in software development. The talk was primarily concerned with the effects of software craft on our emotional states and working relationships. Along the way, I touched on Theory of Constraints, stable and unstable equilibria in work environments, a significant and deliberate omission from Scrum, my take on “legacy code”, applied empathy (never mentioned explicitly, merely woven in), and what agility looks and feels like when you’ve got it.

The talk’s title is admittedly a bit opaque. Inside-Out TDD is the style of Test-Driven Development I usually prefer: we incrementally design objects and their interactions starting with the small and moving toward the large. By extension, I’m calling the style of incrementally redesigning ourselves and our work interactions by starting in the small and expanding outward “Inside-Out TDD-Driven Development” — where “development” this time refers not only to code, but also to people and systems. I usually prefer this style of development, too. The talk (35 minutes, followed by Q&A) attempts to set out my reasoning.

For AO, this kicked off a new series in which they’re hosting well-known tech speakers, free and open to the public. I hope I’ve gotten them off on the right foot.


New on PubMob: Legacy Open Source Fridays

Got limited time, energy, and budget for skill development? PubMob knows how it is. And my latest offering is at a new, even lower price point.

”If you work with legacy code, don’t miss this! Or if you work with code of any sort, you’re likely to learn something useful.”
Esther Derby

Every Friday in April, I’ll be facilitating improvements to a historically significant Open Source legacy-code project. Two sessions each Friday, designed to accommodate a variety of timezones.

”A great opportunity to learn technical excellence with one of the best out there. At the lower rate, it’s a no-brainer.”
Ryan Ripley

Contribute to Open Source with an experienced guide. Enjoy the cumulative effect of your efforts. Gain new insights into your own legacy code. More details here.

Posted Fri Mar 19 04:14:16 2021 Tags: